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How Common are Ransomware Attacks on Hospitals?

By Tom Andre, VP of Information Services at Cooperative of American Physicians (CAP) to Risk Management

Description

What You Need to Know: Hospital Ransomware Attacks

Our guest on Healthcare Matters is Tom Andre, VP of Information Services at Cooperative of American Physicians (CAP). In part 3 of our What You Need to Know: Hospital Ransomware Attacks, we ask Mr. Andre how common ransomware attacks are on hospitals and healthcare facilities. This information is important in the wake of the numerous hospital attacks occurring all around the country, including the attack on Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center.

This is only one of the many questions we asked Mr. Andre about cyber security and how healthcare facilities can protect themselves. Check out all of them here:

  1. Explaining the Recent Ransomware Attacks on Hospitals
  2. Top Two Risks a Hospital Faces in a Malware Attack
  3. How Common are Ransomware Attacks on Hospitals?
  4. The Surprising Ways a Hospital can be Infected with Ransomware
  5. Risk Management Tips for Hospitals to Avoid Ransomware Attacks
  6. Should Hospitals Negotiate with Hackers if Hit with Ransomware?
  7. Protecting Patient Data During Hospital Ransomware Attacks
  8. Full Interview with Tom Andre: What You Need to Know: Hospital Ransomware Attacks

Transcript

Mike Matray: How common is this ransom type of hack in the healthcare industry, and is it as common as the theft of electronic health records?

Tom Andre: Well, as I said, most people don’t disclose a lot about the types of attacks that they get. I can tell you that there’s a recently appearing version of Ransomware called Locke [SP], which comes through an infected Word document. It has been reported that within the first few days, it was infecting computers at a rate of 90,000 per day.

Mike Matray: Wow.

Tom Andre: We’ve all gotten those emails from the attorney in Nigeria that has money, just ready to give to us. You think, “Who would fall for that?” But someone does. And they only need a small percentage to fall for it to keep doing business that way. And if you think if even 10,000 of those 90,000 computers that were infected resulted in a payoff, then the average ransom is about $500, is what I hear, that’s a half a million dollars in a day, if you’ve got 10,000 computers.