Sad Reality for NY Med Mal Reform

Side Note: It’s tough being a physician in New York state. New York has some of the highest med mal policy rates in the country. If you’d like to view a history of New York med mal rates over the past 10 years, we have them. Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like any sort of med mal relief is in sight thanks to the New York state legislature.

Tort reforms have been discussed and med mal caps have been proposed, including the most recent cap proposal of $250,000 for pain and suffering. But, with Senators like John DeFrancisco, R-Syracuse, who is a lawyer, changes like these are not likely to go through any time soon. And, if anything, things could get worse –much worse. Senator DeFrancisco proposed a bill that would increase lawyer fees in med mal cases up to 33% of court awards. If a bill like this were to pass, it could dramatically increase New York med mal premiums. And, as if this were not bad enough, did we mention that Senator DeFrancisco is also council to a personal injury law firm where his son is also a partner? Can you say conflict of interest?

We here at MyMedicalMalpracticeInsurance.com understand that being a physician in New York is hard and the last thing you want to worry about is your New York liability coverage and your med mal rates. Let us get you the cheapest rates out there.

If you’d like to lower your New York med mal premium, complete our free, no-obligation quote request today to see if we can help you.

Wrong Direction: One way not to fix medical malpractice problem
Published: Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 5:00 AM
By The Post-Standard Editorial Board The Post-Standard

The DeFrancisco & Falgiatano Law Firm, in Syracuse, boasts of gargantuan settlements in medical malpractice cases:

$10.5 million for failing to diagnose cancer.
$10 million for physician negligence.
$1.6 million for wrongful death.
$1.4 million for emergency room negligence.

These sound like serious examples of medical incompetence. The settlements include big contingency fees for the law firm — 30 percent of the first $250,000 awarded, 25 percent of the next $250,000, down to 10 percent of everything over $1.25 million.

Here is the Original Article

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