Oregon and Tort Reform Again

Side Note: If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Hopefully, that will be the case with the state of Oregon when it comes to tort reform. Just this past year, the state introduced two bills: one that would establish a cap on non-economic damages and another that would establish a panel to review med mal cases that were pending. Unfortunately, both bills went nowhere. But, there is renewed hope.

Oregon Republicans are once again calling for med mal tort reform. The subject was raised recently via the Joint Committee on Health Care Transformation and discussions about the Oregon Health Plan. (However, if any tort reform takes place, it would have to apply to all Oregonians, not just those covered under the Oregon Health plan.) Maybe after decades of failed attempts, Oregon will finally see significant med mal reform. We will keep you posted.

As we know, good tort reform can accomplish many things. First, it can save physicians significant time and money if they are taken to court. Second, it can help reduce the practice of defensive medicine, which in turn, can lower healthcare costs. Finally, it can often help to lower med mal insurance costs. And, we here at MyMedicalMalpracticeInsurance.com know that our physicians would like to lower their Oregon med mal insurance costs.

MyMedicalMalpracticeInsurance.com may be able to lower your Oregon physician liability policy rates. Contact us today for a free, no-obligation quote.

Tort Reform Or Else
By: David Rosenfeld
From thelundreport.org

Unhappy Oregon DoctorApril 21, 2011 — Republicans on a joint committee charged with transforming the Oregon Health Plan made their first bold move Wednesday night saying without medical malpractice reform they can’t support one of Governor John Kitzhaber’s signature proposals this legislative session.

A first draft of a bill emerged this week in the Joint Committee on Health Care Transformation that’s attempting to incorporate eight weeks of recommendations from a broad group of bi-partisan legislators and industry stakeholders. The aim is to deliver better, more efficient care with less money for the Oregon Health Plan and other essential human services.

This is where you can find the original article.

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