An internet television program that explores the intersection of medicine and the law.

The Number One Takeaway for Physicians on Records Requests

By Richard J. Rymond to EMR/EHR

Description

The Number One Takeaway for Physicians on Records Requests

Join us for the eighth and final part of our latest Healthcare Matters series, Patient Records Requests: What You Need to Know, as we ask attorney Richard J. Rymond of Reminger Co., LPA, to give us his most important takeaway on responding to a patient records request. Mr. Rymond is the Dental Liability Practice Co-Chair at Reminger, and an assistant professor at the Case School of Dental Medicine. He is a frequent speaker on risk management programs for physicians, dentists and allied health professionals.

To see the full episode from the beginning, click here. Or, use the links below to watch each portion separately.

  1. The Right Response to a Records Request
  2. How to Respond to a Records Request from a Third Party
  3. Original Records or Copies: What to Provide
  4. Should You Review Records before Providing Them?
  5. Consulting with Colleagues on a Records Request
  6. Records Requests from Patients Who Owe for Services
  7. Paper Records versus Electronic Health Records
  8. The Number One Takeaway for Physicians on Records Requests
  9. Patient Records Requests: What You Need to Know

Transcript

Mike Matray: As an attorney who’s handled many medical liability allegations, what is the one thing you would stress regarding how to handle a records request?

Richard Rymond: That’s an easy question and we covered it previously, but it bears repeating. Never ever, ever change the record in any manner whatsoever before producing it in response to a request for your records. That means, don’t make an alteration even though it is intended to clarify, even though it’s being made in good faith, just don’t do it. It exposes the physician to new and independent claims that may have nothing to do with the quality of the care provided.