Texas Tort Reform Is NOT a Model for Nationwide Healthcare Reform

side note: This is an interesting counterpoint to the widely accepted idea that Texas tort reform is a model to be emulated. Not everything is a rosy as it seems, however, we do think we can use bits and pieces of the tort reform laws on the books in Texas as a way to start digging out of this mess we are in.

Cherryhill.InjuryBoard.com

Tort reformers like to talk a lot about how the threat of malpractice suits raises health care costs by forcing doctors to practice “defensive medicine”—the ordering of unnecessary tests, procedures, and prescriptions in an attempt to protect themselves against a possible negligence lawsuit.

In a 2008 AMA survey, they remind us, a majority of the doctors who responded admitted to practicing defensive medicine—a number that translates, the AMA calculated, to $1.4 billion more spent annually on health care. If our doctors weren’t threatened into doing this, we’d all save loads of money and our national health crisis would be over.

Are the tort reformers right? Well, let’s look at Texas. Several years ago, the state passed a stringent medical malpractice law that capped awards for pain and suffering at $250,000, and brought the number of medical malpractice liability lawsuits down dramatically.

So the cost of health care in Texas must also be down, you suppose, since doctors don’t face the same malpractice threats as the rest of the country. Eh, No. In fact, Texas is home to three of the top ten most expensive cities in the country to receive health care: McAllen, Harlingen and Corpus Christi. In each of these cities, every Medicare patient is costing the country more than $10,000 a year (a couple thousand more than the national average).

Entire article here

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