Patients’ Group Concerned Over Increasing Health Care Costs

Side note: The Coalition to Protect Patients Rights, a grassroots coalition of over 10,000 health care providers, doctors, and concerned citizens, recently expressed concern over flaws in the newly passed health care reform law. Members of the coalition were shocked to find out that a recent government analysis discovered that overall health care costs will actually increase after the implementation of the new health care reform law. They also fear that the new law will give unelected bureaucrats unwarranted power to cut Medicare funding. Leaders of the coalition point to the absence of medical malpractice insurance reform in the law as a glaring oversight. They contend that over 55 billion is spent annually on the current medical malpractice insurance system. A huge amount of money that could be better spent providing health care to the uninsured and elderly. Visit are rate data section to see how the health care reform law is affecting medical malpractice insurance rates in your state.

Sun Herald

Coalition to Protect Patients Rights (CPPR) spokesman Donald J. Palmisano, MD, expressed concern this week over the recently passed health care bill’s flaws after new survey results indicated that overall health care costs actually will increase following the bill’s passage.
“It’s not surprising to those of us who paid attention to the legislative process that a new government analysis would show health care costs are going to be higher under the reform bill than they would have been without passage of the law,” Dr. Palmisano said. “What I’m most concerned about, however, is that these increased costs will add to the difficulty of patients getting the care they so desperately need. We need less government and more care in our health care system.”

“In addition to failing to rein in health care spending, the health bill’s cuts to the Medicare program’s funding will impede the ability of American patients to get the care they need,” Dr. Palmisano said.

Dr. Palmisano also addressed the planned creation of the Independent Payment Advisory Board which is tasked with cutting Medicare spending, saying it would adversely affect patient access to care “by enabling unelected bureaucrats to make sweeping additional cuts to the Medicare program every year without Congressional approval. And the failure to restore liberty to patients and physicians to negotiate fees for the care needed continues to decrease access to care for patients in their hour of need.”

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